4319
when-should-children-start-school

Children are being attacked from all sides these days. Firstly there is a recommendation that children should not start “formal” education until they are six. As someone who started school at four, I can’t imagine waiting so late, but obviously others take a different line.

Dame Gillian Pugh, review author, said, “four and five-year-olds tended to be at a stage where they were just “tuning in” to learning and that they could be “turned off” if they were made to follow too formal a curriculum, too early on.” Perhaps, but not for all children. The mandated age for children to enter school is questionable as the parents should decide, an issue Douglas Carswell eloquently puts forward here.

On top of this, or indeed in direct competition to it, the European People’s Party believes that children should be given lessons in the benefits of the European Union from the earliest of ages. Of course, some would question how long a lesson it would be.

They claim that, “knowing and understanding, from a young age, the principles, the procedures and the successful history of the European Union, the generations of tomorrow will be immune to any distortion of the perception of the role of the EU and will much better embrace the advantages of this unique project of voluntary sharing of sovereignty.” They want to ‘instruct’ young children in the “benefits” of the EU before they have a chance to formulate their own opinions on the institution.

Clearly both of these examples highlight why government needs to stand aside in the provision of education. The temptation to meddle and mould children’s minds to be in sync with the government thinking of the time is too great. Free enterprise in schooling is best for parents, the taxpayer and the children themselves.