Uber forms of governance

A few weeks ago Samuel Hammond posted some interesting thoughts on multi-sided platform (MSP) technologies like Uber and PayPal, and the role they play in providing forms of governance. You can read the whole thing here, but the outline is as follows: Governance—that is, things like rational planning to solve co-ordination problems, the setting of […]

Economic Nonsense: 39. Only strong government regulation can hold big business in check

It isn’t strong government that causes concern for big business.  They are more worried about the smaller, newer businesses that might take away their trade.  It is competition, not government that they worry about.  Big business often cozies up to big government.  It employs lobbyists to negotiate with civil servants and ministers, and hammers out […]

Economic Nonsense: 24. Strong laws are needed to curb the activity of speculators

The villains of the piece change as the economy changes. At one time it was money-lenders, then corn merchants. In modern times speculators are up there with bankers in popular dislike. Speculators are commonly perceived as people who add nothing to a product, and often as people who profit from the hardships endured by others. […]

Who rules Britain: how much of our law comes from Brussels?

Business for Britain was right, on 2nd March, to question the proportion of our laws that comes from Brussels. Nigel Farage says it is 78%, Nick Clegg 7% and the House of Commons Library 13.2% but that is also an understatement due to the Library’s omission of no less than 49,699 EU Regulations, during the […]

Enemy of the steak: what’s wrong with government diet guidelines

As an amateur chef I have become increasingly interested in the government’s guidelines and regulations around food. For something so central to our lives, the advice and rules the government makes to do with what we eat are usually overlooked. Two developments this week suggest that this is a mistake. I have previously argued that […]