ASI report “Quids In” is featured in CityAM, The Huffington Post, and The Sun Online

A new report from the Adam Smith Institute, “Quids In: How sterlingization and free banking could help Scotland flourish”, was featured in CityAM, The Huffington Post and The Sun Online.

The report argues that an independent Scotland could have a more stable economy than the rest of the UK if adopted a policy of, what it calls, ‘adaptive sterlingization’, which combines unilateral use of the pound with financial reforms to remove government protection of established banks.

From CityAM:

Yesterday the Adam Smith Institute (ASI) published a report arguing that Alex Salmond’s plan B, using sterling without a currency union, should actually be plan A. The report outlined how “adaptive sterlingsation” could benefit the Scottish economy by acting as a market-based mechanism to stabilise demand during a downturn.

Furthermore, the repeal of financial regulations that privilege established banks could keep Scottish banks prudent as there would be no deposit insurance or central bank to act as a lender of last resort, according to the ASI.

From The Huffington Post:

A new report from the Adam Smith Institute said that “sterlingisation”, combined with reforms to banking regulations, could lead to banks taking fewer risks, reducing the likelihood of future financial crises.

Sam Bowman, research director at the Adam Smith Institute and the author of the report, said Scotland was “almost uniquely primed for such a system of ‘adaptive sterlingisation’”.

The prospect of Scotland using the pound with the formal agreement of the rest of the UK, and without the back-up of having the Bank of England as a lender of last resort, was raised as Salmond comes under increasing pressure in the run-up to next month’s referendum to set out an alternative to a currency union.

From The Sun Online:

A report by the Adam Smith Institute claims our banks would take fewer risks after independence if they cut ties to the Bank of England.

The study says the result would be greater stability than in the UK — limiting the danger of another disastrous crash like in 2008.

Author Sam Bowman, research director at the Institute, said: “The path outlined would go almost unnoticed by the average Scot.

“But at the next big economic shock they might wonder why their system was so much more stable than that of the country they left behind.”

 

The report, “Quids In: How sterlingization and free banking could help Scotland flourish”, can be read and downloaded for free here.

 

Kate Andrews comments on Venezuelan president’s plan to fingerprint supermarket shoppers in CityAM

The Adam Smith Institute’s Communications Manager, Kate Andrews, commented on the Venezuelan president’s plan to implement fingerprinting systems in supermarkets in CityAM:

The President of Venezuela, Nicolas Maduro, has announced plans for a major mandatory fingerprinting system to combat the increasingly dire food shortages and rampant smuggling afflicting the Latin American state…

…Communications manager at the Adam Smith Institute, Kate Andrews, said:

A system that needs to implement heavy surveillance in local food markets or deploy 17,000 troops along the border to prevent the smuggling of staple food items is a failed system indeed. Rather than allocating time and resources into policing the purchases of apples and pears, President Maduro should abolish price controls, creating an economy where commerce and consumption are encouraged, not criminalised.

Read the full article here.

The Scotland Tonight Feature on the ASI’s “Quids In” Report

On Thursday (21 August 2014), STV’s Scotland Tonight featured the Adam Smith Institute’s new report “Quids In: How sterlingization and free banking could help Scotland flourish”.

The feature included an interview with the report’s author and Research Director of the Adam Smith Institute, Sam Bowman. It also included an interview with the Executive Vice President of Atlas Bank in Panama, Ariel San Martine-Mendez.

 

 

The report, “Quids In: How sterlingization and free banking could help Scotland flourish”, can be read and downloaded for free here.

A Sterling Solution for an Independent Scotland – Sam Bowman writes for The Wall Street Journal Europe

Research Director and author of the ASI’s new report “Quids In: How sterlingization and free banking could help Scotland flourish”, Sam Bowman, writes for The Wall Street Journal Europe:

The Scottish independence debate has been dominated by one question: What currency would an independent Scotland use? Ever since Chancellor George Osborne ruled out the prospect of a formal currency union between Scotland and the rest of the United Kingdom, Alex Salmond’s Scottish Nationalists have evaded the question, threatening their chances of victory in next month’s referendum on a split from the U.K.

But if Scots looked to their own history they would find a surprisingly simple solution. The best choice for Scotland, even better than a currency union, would be “adaptive sterlingization”—use of the British pound without a currency union with the rest of the U.K., combined with financial reforms that removed deposit insurance, reserve requirements and central-bank protections from banks.

Read the full article here.

The report, “Quids In: How sterlingization and free banking could help Scotland flourish”, can be read and downloaded for free here.

The report argues that an independent Scotland could have a more stable economy than the rest of the UK if adopted a policy of, what it calls, ‘adaptive sterlingization’, which combines unilateral use of the pound with financial reforms to remove government protection of established banks.

Sam Bowman discusses new ASI report “Quids In” on BBC Scotland

Research Director of the Adam Smith Institute and author of the report “Quids In: How sterlingization and free banking could help Scotland flourish”, Sam Bowman, appeared on BBC Scotland to discuss the paper’s proposed policy of ‘adaptive sterlingization.’

The report, “Quids In: How sterlingization and free banking could help Scotland flourish”, can be read and downloaded for free here.