Sam Bowman’s comments on the PM’s pledge to lower tax rates feature in the Mail Online

The Adam Smith Institute’s Research Director, Sam Bowman, was quoted in The Mail Online, supporting the Prime Minister’s pledge to cut taxes for low-income workers.

The changes were welcomed by tax campaigners. Sam Bowman, research director of the Adam Smith Institute, said: ‘It’s great news that the Prime Minister has pledged to raise the tax-free personal allowance to £12,500. Tax cuts for the poor are one of the best ways to help beat poverty in Britain.

‘Taking minimum wage workers out of tax is a way of giving workers a ‘Living Wage’ without risking jobs. The difference between the Living Wage and the minimum wage is entirely tax – if we stopped taxing minimum wage workers, they would earn the equivalent to a post-tax Living Wage. ‘

Mr Bowman said more could still be done, including easing the burden of National Insurance, which works in a different but similar way to income tax and in effect adds 12 per cent to the tax most workers pay.

He said: ‘National Insurance contributions are just another form of income tax and are not affected by this threshold rise. Raising that threshold and pegging the new NI and income tax thresholds to the minimum wage rate should be the next government’s top priority to beat the scourge of low pay once and for all.’

A further tax-cutting commitment was given on business tax, with the Prime Minister promising that the UK would ‘always have the most competitive corporate taxes in the G20′.

Read the full article here.

 

Sam Bowman is quoted in The Daily Express supporting the PM’s pledge to cut taxes for low-income workers

The Adam Smith Institute’s Research Director, Sam Bowman, was quoted in The Daily Express, supporting the Prime Minister’s pledge to cut taxes for low-income workers.

Plaudits from colleagues and business leaders came after David Cameron’s conference performance yesterday.

Tory Chief Whip Michael Gove said “absolutely fantastic speech” had laid out the “very clear choice” for next May.

Chancellor George Osborne said it was Mr Cameron’s “best speech” to date and that the contrast with Labour rival Ed Miliband’s speech was week “wouldn’t be starker”.

Sam Bowman of the Adam Smith Institute said: “Tax cuts for the poor are one of the best ways to help beat poverty.”

Press Release: PM’s personal allowance announcement will help beat low pay once and for all

Commenting on the Prime Minister’s pledge to raise the tax free allowance from £10,500 to £12,500, Research Director of the Adam Smith Institute, Sam Bowman, said:

It’s great news that the Prime Minister has pledged to raise the tax-free personal allowance to £12,500. Tax cuts for the poor are one of the best ways to help beat poverty in Britain.

Taking minimum wage workers out of tax is a way of giving workers a ‘Living Wage’ without risking jobs. The difference between the Living Wage and the minimum wage is entirely tax – if we stopped taxing minimum wage workers, they would earn the equivalent to a post-tax Living Wage.

This has been a key policy advocated by the Adam Smith Institute for over a decade, and will allow the working poor to keep more of their earnings. And with just a few more steps, we can guarantee a basic standard of living for all workers that boosts the economy too.

National Insurance contributions are just another form of income tax and are not affected by this threshold rise. Raising that threshold and pegging the new NI and income tax thresholds to the minimum wage rate should be the next government’s top priority to beat the scourge of low pay once and for all.

Notes to editors:

For further comments or to arrange an interview, contact Kate Andrews, Communications Manager, at kate@adamsmith.org / 07584 778207.


The Adam Smith Institute is an independent libertarian think tank based in London. It advocates classically liberal public policies to create a richer, freer world.

Sam Bowman’s comments on the rise to the National Minimum Wage feature in The Sun

The Adam Smith Institute’s Research Director, Sam Bowman, was quoted in The Sun on the risks associated with the rise in the National Minimum Wage:

The Adam Smith Institute warned the rise would threaten jobs. Research director Sam Bowman said the national minimum created unemployment. He said: “There are better, if more politically challenging, ways to fight poverty.”

Labour has vowed to increase the rate to £8 over the next five years.