The Mail on Sunday’s feature on TEN’s Parliamentary Snapshot survey

The Mail on Sunday ran an exclusive feature on TEN‘s Parliamentary Snapshot- the first survey of its kind, which uncovers the views of MPs on policies impacting entrepreneurs.

From The Mail on Sunday:

Half had not heard of the GrowthAccelerator, a support scheme for fast-growing firms, while the existence of Tech City, the cluster of technology start-ups in East London was unknown to 48 per cent.

The Seed Enterprise Investment Scheme, which offers tax incentives to savers investing in small businesses was unknown to 42 per cent, and the same percentage had neither heard of Entrepreneurs’ Relief, a Capital Gains Tax relief for entrepreneurs selling their businesses, nor Patent Box, which allows companies to apply a lower rate of corporation tax to profits from patented inventions and other innovations.

Philip Salter, director of The Entrepreneurs Network, which is supported by investment firm Octopus and the Adam Smith Institute, said: ‘It’s encouraging that MPs are increasingly vocal about supporting entrepreneurs. However the fact that they are unfamiliar with the policies already in place is worrying. MPs don’t appear adequately informed to vote on future policy changes affecting entrepreneurs.

‘MPs should be familiar with these schemes so they are able to pass on details to the many entrepreneurs they meet in their constituencies.’

Read the full feature here.

In the first survey of its kind, Parliamentary Snapshot- conducted for the think tank The Entrepreneur’s Network by YouGov- has uncovered the views of MPs on polices impacting entrepreneurs. 

Read or download the briefing paper here.

The Entrepreneurs Network is a cross-party think tank designed to bring entrepreneurs to the forefront of political discourse and help make Britain the best place in the world to start a business. TEN is based within the Adam Smith Institute and is supported by Octopus Investments, one of the UK’s fastest growing fund management companies specialising in smaller company investing.

ASI Senior Fellow is quoted in The Guardian on Mayor of London’s ‘Europe Report’

Senior Fellow of the Adam Smith Institute, Tim Ambler, was quoted in The Guardian, arguing that the Mayor of London’s ‘Europe Report’ has a “number of failings”, making it unreliable:

Tim Ambler, a senior fellow of the Adam Smith Institute, described The Europe Report: a Win-Win Situation as an “important review” but with “a number of failings” including offering findings “we cannot rely on”. He contended that Lyons is “not specific” about what would be needed to bring about what he concludes would be the best of four theoretical scenarios for London, this being the UK staying in the EU “but with substantial reforms”.

Read the full article here.

Sam Bowman discusses new ASI report “Quids In” on CNBC

Research Director of the Adam Smith Institute and author of the report “Quids In: How sterlingization and free banking could help Scotland flourish”, Sam Bowman, appeared on CNBC to discuss the paper’s proposed policy of ‘adaptive sterlingization.’

The report, “Quids In: How sterlingization and free banking could help Scotland flourish”, can be read and downloaded for free here.

Answer to Scots’ currency dilemma- Sam Bowman writes for the Yorkshire Post

Ahead of tonight’s BBC referendum debate, Research Director and author of the ASI’s new report “Quids In: How sterlingization and free banking could help Scotland flourish”, Sam Bowman, writes for The Yorkshire Post:

SCOTS HAVE rightly focused on the question of currency as they prepare to decide whether to vote for or against independence next month. In the last television debate between Alex Salmond and Alastair Darling, the SNP leader struggled to explain how Scotland would cope without a formal currency union with the rest of the UK. Tonight, he will need to do better.

In a new paper for the Adam Smith Institute, I offer a solution to Salmond’s problem. I argue that an independent Scotland should continue using the pound sterling without a currency union. Combined with a system of financial reform based on Scotland’s most successful period in economic history, this system of ‘adaptive sterlingisation’ could give Scotland a highly stable banking system and economy in the long run.

The report, “Quids In: How sterlingization and free banking could help Scotland flourish”, can be read and downloaded for free here.

ASI report “Quids In” is featured in CityAM, The Huffington Post, and The Sun Online

A new report from the Adam Smith Institute, “Quids In: How sterlingization and free banking could help Scotland flourish”, was featured in CityAM, The Huffington Post and The Sun Online.

The report argues that an independent Scotland could have a more stable economy than the rest of the UK if adopted a policy of, what it calls, ‘adaptive sterlingization’, which combines unilateral use of the pound with financial reforms to remove government protection of established banks.

From CityAM:

Yesterday the Adam Smith Institute (ASI) published a report arguing that Alex Salmond’s plan B, using sterling without a currency union, should actually be plan A. The report outlined how “adaptive sterlingsation” could benefit the Scottish economy by acting as a market-based mechanism to stabilise demand during a downturn.

Furthermore, the repeal of financial regulations that privilege established banks could keep Scottish banks prudent as there would be no deposit insurance or central bank to act as a lender of last resort, according to the ASI.

From The Huffington Post:

A new report from the Adam Smith Institute said that “sterlingisation”, combined with reforms to banking regulations, could lead to banks taking fewer risks, reducing the likelihood of future financial crises.

Sam Bowman, research director at the Adam Smith Institute and the author of the report, said Scotland was “almost uniquely primed for such a system of ‘adaptive sterlingisation’”.

The prospect of Scotland using the pound with the formal agreement of the rest of the UK, and without the back-up of having the Bank of England as a lender of last resort, was raised as Salmond comes under increasing pressure in the run-up to next month’s referendum to set out an alternative to a currency union.

From The Sun Online:

A report by the Adam Smith Institute claims our banks would take fewer risks after independence if they cut ties to the Bank of England.

The study says the result would be greater stability than in the UK — limiting the danger of another disastrous crash like in 2008.

Author Sam Bowman, research director at the Institute, said: “The path outlined would go almost unnoticed by the average Scot.

“But at the next big economic shock they might wonder why their system was so much more stable than that of the country they left behind.”

 

The report, “Quids In: How sterlingization and free banking could help Scotland flourish”, can be read and downloaded for free here.