Banning Trump from UK endores illberal immigration system|Kate Andrews for The Times Red Box

Head of Communications at the ASI, Kate Andrews, wrote for The Times Red Box on why calling for Trump to be banned from the UK is just as bad as him calling for muslims to be banned from America.

Who could have guessed that after Trump called for an illiberal immigration system that keeps people out of a country based on their beliefs, over half a million people in the UK would sign a petition to show their support for such a policy.

Those who signed the Ban Trump campaign must think his exile would be a punishment to fit his crime. Unlike Trump’s view on Muslim immigrants, their views on Trump are undoubtedly correct, which makes revoking his freedom of movement morally permissible from their perspective.

Read the full article here.

Sam Bowman's comments on Fat Cat Tuesday feature on ITV News Online

Executive director of the ASI, Sam Bowman, has had his comments on Fat Cat Tuesday and high pay featured on ITV News Online.

The Adam Smith Institute dismissed the High Pay Centre calculations as "pub economics, not serious analysis" and said the group had failed to grasp the true value of CEOs.

"Chief executives can be worth quite a lot to firms, as is shown by huge moves in company share prices when good CEOs are hired, or bad CEOs are fired," the think tank's executive director Sam Bowman said.

Read the full article here.

Sam Bowman's comments on high pay feature in the IBTimes and City AM

Executive Director Sam Bowman’s comments on the High Pay Centre’s promotion of ‘Fat Cat Tuesday’ have featured in the IBTimes and City AM. From the IBTimes:

However, the findings have been dismissed as "pub economics" by the Adam Smith Institute.

"None of these complaints are valid unless the High Pay Centre thinks it has a better way of estimating the value of executives to firms than those firms themselves," said Sam Bowman, the think tank's executive director.

"The High Pay Commission's complaints only make sense if you assume firms don't actually care about making money – which is to say, they don't make sense at all."

Read the full article here.

From City AM:

However, some have warned that the figures are oversimplified. The research from the High Pay Centre think tank has been criticised by the Adam Smith Institute as “pub economics, not serious analysis”

“None of these complaints are valid unless the High Pay Centre thinks it has a better way of estimating the value of executives to firms than those firms themselves. Can the High Pay Centre tell us how much chief executives are worth? If not, how can they say that they are overpaid?” said the think tank’s executive director Sam Bowman.

Read the full article here.

ASI comments on high pay feature in the Financial Times and Forbes

Executive Director Sam Bowman’s comments on the High Pay Centre’s promotion of ‘Fat Cat Tuesday’ have featured in the Financial Times and Forbes. From the Financial Times:

Sam Bowman, executive director of the Adam Smith Institute, dismissed Fat Cat day as “the hand-waving of pub economics, not serious analysis”. He said: “Chief executives can be worth quite a lot to firms, as is shown by huge moves in company share prices when good CEOs are hired or bad CEOs are fired. Steve Jobs can make a firm; Steve Ballmer can break a firm.”

Read the full article here.

From Forbes (written by ASI Senior Fellow Tim Worstall):

There’s a number of problems with this manufactured outrage, as my colleague at the Adam Smith Institute, Sam Bowman, points out:

Top bosses will have earned more money by the end of Tuesday than the average worker will do in a year, campaign group the High Pay Centre has claimed. The group has declared the day Fat Cat Tuesday, based on chief executives earning £5m a year, compared with the median UK salary of £27,645. The think tank says its aim is to highlight the “unfair pay gap”.

Read the full article here.

ASI comments on high pay feature in BBC News and Sky News articles

Executive Director Sam Bowman's comments on the High Pay Centre's promotion of 'Fat Cat Tuesday' have featured in both BBC News and Sky News articles. From BBC News:

The calculations were criticised as "pub economics, not serious analysis" by the Adam Smith Institute.

"None of these complaints are valid unless the High Pay Centre thinks it has a better way of estimating the value of executives to firms than those firms themselves," said the institute's executive director, Sam Bowman.

"The High Pay Commission's complaints only make sense if you assume firms don't actually care about making money - which is to say, they don't make sense at all."

Read the full article here.

From Sky News:

Sam Bowman, the executive director of the Adam Smith Institute, said: "Despite consistent attacks on chief executive pay, the HPC has never told us how much they think CEOs are actually worth.

"Their complaints are the hand-waving of pub economics, not serious analysis ...Can the High Pay Centre tell us how much CEOs are worth? If not, how can they say that they are overpaid?

"Chief executives can be worth quite a lot to firms, as is shown by huge moves in company share prices when good CEOs are hired, or bad CEOs are fired."

He added: "The High Pay Commission’s complaints only make sense if you assume firms don’t actually care about making money – which is to say, they don’t make sense at all."

Read the full article here.

ASI comments on high pay feature in the IBTimes UK and Vice News

Executive Director Sam Bowman's comments on the High Pay Centre's promotion of 'Fat Cat Tuesday' have featured in the IBTimes UK and Vice News. From the IBTimes UK:

The Adam Smith Institute said the day was based on "pub economics" rather than "serious analysis". Executive director of this think tank, Sam Bowman, said: "None of these complaints are valid unless the High Pay Centre thinks it has a better way of estimating the value of executives to firms than those firms themselves. Can the High Pay Centre tell us how much CEOs are worth? If not, how can they say that they are overpaid?

"Chief executives can be worth quite a lot to firms, as is shown by huge moves in company share prices when good CEOs are hired, or bad CEOs are fired. Steve Jobs can make a firm; Steve Ballmer can break a firm. The High Pay Commission's complaints only make sense if you assume firms don't actually care about making money – which is to say, they don't make sense at all."

Read the full article here.

From Vice:

Sam Bowman, executive director of free market think-tank the Adam Smith Institute, dismissed the research as "pub economics."

"Despite consistent attacks on chief executive pay, the HPC has never told us how much they think CEOs are actually worth. Their complaints are the hand-waving of pub economics, not serious analysis — 'Surely you don't think executives can be this valuable to firms?', or 'Surely you don't think executives are more important now than they were forty years ago?'

He added: "Chief executives can be worth quite a lot to firms, as is shown by huge moves in company share prices when good CEOs are hired, or bad CEOs are fired. Steve Jobs can make a firm; Steve Ballmer can break a firm. The High Pay Commission's complaints only make sense if you assume firms don't actually care about making money — which is to say, they don't make sense at all."

Read the full article here.