ASI report "Wind Power Reassessed" is featured in The Daily Express and Yorkshire Post

A new report, "Wind Power Reassessed: A review of the UK wind resource for electricity generation", has been featured in The Daily Express and Yorkshire Post. The report, published jointly by the Adam Smith Institute and the Scientific Alliance, severely undermines the case for a move towards more wind generation in the UK because it suggests that wind can never be a major reliable source of energy for the UK. Specifically, the report found that wind farms generate below 20% of their supposed output for 29 weeks a year, and only exceed 90% of their rated output for 17 hours a year.

From The Daily Express:

Experts discovered that turbines break the 90 per cent efficiency mark for only 17 hours a year.

Data showed wind farms generate below 20 per cent of supposed output for 20 weeks a year and less than 10 per cent for nine weeks.

The statistics are in a report by the respected Adam Smith Institute think tank and Scientific Alliance.

The findings follow news that a Lords committee was told relying on wind power would lead to a doubling of energy bills and power cuts by 2030.

Read the full article here.

From the Yorkshire Post:

The study on new data by the Adam Smith Institute and Scientific Alliance says these findings suggest the UK’s energy infrastructure can never be reliant on them in any significant way.

Specifically, the study found that wind farms generate below 20 per cent of their supposed output for 20 weeks a year, and generate below ten per cent for nine weeks a year.

Read the full article here.

 

ASI report “Wind Power Reassessed” is featured in CityAM and Breitbart London

A new report, “Wind Power Reassessed: A review of the UK wind resource for electricity generation”, has been featured in CityAM and Breitbart London.

The report, published jointly by the Adam Smith Institute and the Scientific Alliance, severely undermines the case for a move towards more wind generation in the UK because it suggests that wind can never be a major reliable source of energy for the UK. Specifically, the report found that wind farms generate below 20% of their supposed output for 29 weeks a year, and only exceed 90% of their rated output for 17 hours a year.

From CityAM:

Despite falling costs and improving technology, wind farms continue to be wildly inefficient and overly expensive, according to a new report released today.

In the report for the Adam Smith Institute and the Scientific Alliance, author Dr Capell Aris analysed data on the wind speed and direction collected from a total of 22 sites across the UK, with 6.5m individual recordings.

He found that on average, UK wind farms top 80 per cent of their potential output for less than a week every year. It gets worse as, according to the study, wind turbines are only able to produce 90 per cent or more of their potential power output for a meagre 17 hours a year.

Read the full article here.

From Breitbart London:

The report was undertaken by the Scientific Alliance and the Adam Smith Institute. Using data on wind speed and direction gathered hourly from 22 sites around the UK over the last nine years, the researchers were able to build a comprehensive picture of how much the wind blows in the UK, where it blows, and how variable it is.

They found that, contrary to popular opinion, variability was a significant factor as “swings of around 10 percent are normal” across the whole system within 30 – 90 minute timeframes. “This observation contradicts the claim that a widespread wind fleet installation will smooth variability,” the authors write.

Read the full article here.

Press Release: Wind farms generate below 20% of their supposed output for 20 weeks a year, a new report finds

  • A new study has found that wind farms generate below 20% of their supposed output for 20 weeks a year, and generate below 10% for 9 weeks a year.
  • Wind farms, on average, only exceed 90% of their rated output for 17 hours a year.
  • Though the government acknowledges that wind farms produce much less energy than their sticker capacity would suggest, the report shows that even the average production (of around a quarter of capacity) is extremely misleading about the amount of power wind farms can be relied up to provide.

Wind farms are extremely volatile, with outputs fluctuating by five percentage points over short periods of time, a report based on new data by the Adam Smith Institute and Scientific Alliance has found. These findings suggest the UK’s energy infrastructure can never be reliant on them in any significant way.

Specifically, the study found that wind farms generate below 20% of their supposed output for 20 weeks a year, and generate below 10% for 9 weeks a year. Wind farms, on average, only exceed 90% of their rated output for 17 hours a year.

The paper, “Wind Power Reassessed: A review of the UK wind resource for electricity generation", looks at previously unexamined wind speed data reported by anemometers located at various airfields, used as a proxy for nearby wind farms, and concludes that UK wind farms, on average, exceed 80% of their supposed output for less than one week every year.

The study also looks at the short-term (30 – 90 minute) variability of wind generation and reveals swings in output are far higher than is normal from conventional energy generation, such as from gas or nuclear plants. Swings of five percentage points of output are not uncommon, which contradicts the claim that a widespread wind fleet installation will smooth variability. There are frequent but unpredictable periods where wind energy generation fails for days on end.

The report will severely undermine the case for a move towards yet more wind generation because it suggests that wind can never be a major, reliable source of energy for the UK. It also suggests that the UK's drive to reduce its carbon footprint through expanding wind power is misguided. Wind power is so unreliable and intermittent that it makes much more sense to look to nuclear and gas as better low emission alternatives to the status quo.

In his research, the report’s author Dr. Capell Aris looked at 6.5m individual recordings from 22 sites in the UK and 21 from Ireland and the continent.

Commenting on the report, Dr Aris said:

The current reliance on wind energy to reduce carbon dioxide emissions is inefficient and compromises energy security. Power output of the studied system is below 20% of nominal capacity for over 20 weeks of the year, and below 10% for 9 weeks.

When we study those periods when production falls below 20% of rated capacity, more than three quarters of this occurs in periods longer than 12 hours. Each winter has periods where wind generation is negligible for several days.

The situation across the whole of northern Europe is much the same, so a Europe-wide power grid would provide no extra security; the study demonstrates that interconnectors will not solve wind’s intermittency problem.

Head of Policy at the Adam Smith Institute, Ben Southwood, said:

Wind farms are a bad way of reducing emissions and a bad way of producing power. They are expensive and deeply inefficient and it seems like they reduce the value of housing enormously in nearby areas. We probably do want to reduce carbon emissions, because according to the IPCC global warming will begin to slow economic growth in one hundred years, but nuclear and gas power are our best ways of doing that until cheap and efficient energy storage options are available on a vast scale to smooth the highly variable output of renewables.

Director of the Scientific Alliance, Martin Livermore, said:

This study is a graphic illustration that wind turbines cannot provide a secure supply of electricity, no matter how large the distribution grid.

Notes to editors:

For further comments or to arrange an interview, contact Kate Andrews, Communications Manager, at kate@adamsmith.org / 07584 778207.

The Adam Smith Institute is an independent libertarian think tank based in London. It advocates classically liberal public policies to create a richer, freer world.

The Scientific Alliance was formed in 2001 to encourage politicians to make policy on the basis of scientific evidence rather than lobbying by vested interests.

How to get employer support for an EMBA - Programmes Director for TEN writes for CityAM

The Programmes Director of The Entrepreneur's Network, Annabel Denham, explains how a person can seek corporate funding for an Executive Masters in Business Administration in CityAM. 

CORPORATE sponsorship for the Executive Master of Business Administration (EMBA) course has fallen in recent years. In 2007, 34 per cent of students received full financial sponsorship from their employers (according to the EMBA Council), but by 2011, the figure had dropped to 27 per cent – and it has continued to decline since. The financial downturn has undeniably played a role, but so too has the changing face of the workplace. Lifetime employees are a rare beast nowadays – many use executive-level business degrees to change careers.

Read the full article here.

British Entrepreneurs Split On EU Exit - Director of TEN writes for Forbes

The Director of The Entrepreneur's Network, Philip Salter, has started writing regular columns for Forbes. His first piece - British Entrepreneurs Split On EU Exit - looks at the battle between entrepreneurs who have varying praise and criticism for the European Union.

Following the lengthy and ultimately anticlimactic Scottish referendum, you could be forgiven for thinking that the British people are ready to bunker down and leave the redrawing of political boundaries for another decade. But nothing could be further from the truth. Although the Scots rebellion has been quelled (for now), attention has instantly returned to the question of Britain’s political relationship with our brothers and sisters across the English Channel. For many Brits, Europe remains a foreign country: they do things differently there.

Read the full article here.

Ben Southwood's comments on the ECB feature in The Telegraph

Head of Policy Ben Southwood's comments on ECB policy were featured in The Telegraph:

Unless "accompanied by solid growth", disinflation or deflation is a sign of weak demand in the euro area, said Ben Southwood, head of policy at think tank the Adam Smith Institute.

"This means that the disinflation and deflation across the bloc is down to a shortage of demand and money; passive tightening by the ECB, which seems hell-bent on a lost quarter century of eurozone growth", he added.

Read the full article here.

The ASI's proposal to roll back the green belt is featured in The Observer

The Adam Smith Institute's proposal to roll back the green belt was featured in The Observer and The Guardian:

As one campaigner tells me: “It is the only universally popular part of the planning system.”

Yet it is being questioned. The libertarian thinktank the Adam Smith Institute has argued that, if a strip merely half a mile wide were shaved off the London green belt, 800,000 new homes could be built.

Read the full article here.