Compulsory Education, Child Rights, and the Foundation of Society

Vishal Wilde’s series of think pieces continues with a radical look at the role of government in education. Why, he asks, do we assume that both children and society are better off when we make education compulsory in childhood? He suggests that using state coercion in this way is reprehensible and unproductive. Instead, children should be liberated from the constraints the state currently places upon them, for their own benefit and ours.

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A Regular Choice Between Voting Systems

With May’s general election set to emphasise the shortcomings of First Past The Post more than any other in recent memory, Vishal Wilde posits that we should empower voters by allowing them to choose their electoral system as they vote, and by embracing plurality in electoral systems.

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Prof. John Alfred Blyth Hibbs OBE

John Hibbs was born in Birmingham but spent his childhood in Brightlingsea, the Essex trading and sea-faring town from where came both sides of his family, Hibbs and Blyth. His father died just ten days after John’s birth, so John was brought up by his mother, supported by two aunts and his grandmother. He was educated first locally, followed by Colchester Royal Grammar School, and then boarded at Haileybury College, Hertfordshire.

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A Divorce for Auntie

In his 1987 report ‘A Divorce for Auntie’, Nicholas O’Shaughnessy of Loughborough University presents objections to the “monolithic” ideological nature of the BBC. Today, the debate on the BBC’s ideological leanings continues, with 41% of those polled in 2013 saying they believed it to display some bias. This considered, O’Shaughnessy’s report remains important to this ongoing controversy.

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