Sam Bowman

Sam Bowman is Research Director at the Adam Smith Institute. He writes on immigration, Bleeding Heart Libertarianism, and complexity in public policy.

Patterns of sustainable specialization and trade

Written by | Friday 3 February 2012

We've just released a new paper by Arnold Kling, "Patterns of Sustainable Specialization and Trade: A Smith-Ricardo Theory of Macroeconomics". Kling has been writing about patterns of sustainable specialization and trade (PSST) for some time now at EconLog, and I was delighted when he agreed to lay out his case in an ASI monograph.

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Ayn Rand's birthday

Written by | Thursday 2 February 2012

Ayn Rand, author of the novels The Fountainhead, Atlas Shrugged and books on the philosophy of capitalism like The Virtue of Selfishness and Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal

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Economics Is Fun, Part 3: Specialization

Written by | Thursday 2 February 2012

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The cost of the benefit cap

Written by | Wednesday 1 February 2012

benefits

 

The BBC has an article today that shows the harm that the benefit cap would do to an average family on benefits. The graph, above, summarizes their income and expenditures.

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Join the Next Generation

Written by | Wednesday 1 February 2012

In Facebook's drive to annoy its users to the point of madness, our The Next Generation (TNG) group for under-30s (this is quite a strict rule, I'm afraid) has been archived so it's no longer useful. Our Next Generation events are hugely popular monthly events for under-30s with a short speech by a person of interest and an informal reception afterwards. If you'd like to subscribe to our Next Generation emails and come along to future TNG events, please enter your email address in this form.

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What is private equity for?

Written by | Wednesday 1 February 2012

Following his landslide win in the Florida primary election last night, it now seems certain that Mitt Romney will be the Republican party's presidential nominee. Romney will be the first presidential candidate to have spent most of his career in the financial sector, specifically private equity, a sector many view with suspicion and fear. Romney's opponents have made much of the fact that he succeeded at his job by "firing people". Although I'm not much of a Romney fan, this is a slur caused mainly by the confusion surrounding private equity.

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Gay marriage is a libertarian issue

Written by | Tuesday 31 January 2012

Over at the Telegraph, the ASI's JP Floru has an excellent article in defence of gay marriage. He makes the point that what we think of as the "tradition of marriage" — the state- and church-endorsed institution that is currently reserved for heterosexual relationships — is in fact a relatively new phenomenon rooted in modern codifications of common law practices.

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Hayek on the euro

Written by | Wednesday 25 January 2012

"In many respects a single international currency is not better but worse than a national currency if it is not better run. It would leave a country with a financially more sophisticated public not even the chance of escaping from the consequences of the crude prejudices governing the decisions of the others. The advantage of an international authority should be mainly to protect a member state from the harmful measures of others, not to force it to join in their follies."

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Only bombing would be worse than rent control

Written by | Wednesday 25 January 2012

The political battle over the welfare bill has led some people to propose rent controls as a solution to rising rents in Britain’s cities (especially London). Rent control, though, is probably the most unambiguously awful policy ever to be tried in modern western democracy. In theory and practice it is a disaster, choking off the supply of new rentable homes and grinding the quality of existing rented accommodation.

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Subscribing to the ASI blog

Written by | Tuesday 24 January 2012

Since moving to our new site, some of you have noticed that your RSS feed subscription has stopped working. I've tried to fix the old one, but to no avail, so readers will need to subscribe to a new, fully-functional RSS feed we've set up.

If you're used to reading the website in a feed reader like Google Reader, Bloglines, Netvibes or something else you'll need to resubscribe to our new feed address: http://feeds.feedburner.com/adamsmithinstitute.

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