Will disclosed gender pay data help women in the workplace? Kate Andrews argues NO in City AM

Head of Communications Kate Andrews argued that Cameron's plan to make large businesses disclose their gender pay gaps will not help women in the workplace in the City AM debate forum:

Kate Andrews, head of communications at the Adam Smith Institute, says No

Gender pay gap stats are already manipulated to suggest that women are the targets of sexist employers throughout the UK. But the facts simply don’t support this. Women aged 22-39 working more than 30 hours a week are paid more hourly than their male counterparts.

There’s also evidence that women who stay on their career path are more likely to be promoted by their employers. Furthermore, if women truly earned less for “being women”, employers would surely drop their male staff to increase their profits. The truth behind the pay gap is not gender discrimination, but rather different choices down the line that lead some women to value other things in life more than their salary.

If large businesses are forced to publish their alleged pay gaps, we will be left with more meaningless, inaccurate numbers that will only perpetuate the myth. The numerous and complex factors that go into determining salary cannot simply be explained by a number on a spreadsheet.

Read the full debate here.

Kate Andrews's comments on Cameron's pay gap pledge feature in the Guardian and Daily Mail

Head of Communications Kate Andrews's comments on the Prime Minister's pay gap pledge have featured in the Guardian and Daily Mail. From the Guardian (page 1):

Kate Andrews, its head of communications, said: “According to the ONS, women between the ages of 22–39 working more than 30 hours a week earn, on average, more than their male counterparts.

“Forcing businesses with more than 250 employees to publish their ‘pay gaps’ will only promote more myths and confusion. There is no such thing as an ‘average salary’; education, previous experiences, negotiating tactics, and unique abilities all contribute to one’s salary, none of which can be known by comparing John and Jane’s annual take-home pay on a spreadsheet.

“Furthermore, men and women often choose to make different career decisions – usually based on flexibility and rigour – so they can embrace other, equally meaningful parts of their life; this, naturally, can be reflected in their pay.”

Read the full article here.

From The Daily Mail (page 4):

Kate Andrews, from the Adam Smith Institute, said: 'There is no such thing as an "average salary". Education, previous experiences, negotiating tactics and unique abilities all contribute to one's salary, none of which can be known by comparing John and Jane's annual take-home pay on a spreadsheet."

Also, from the Mail Online:

Kate Andrews at the free-market think tank the Adam Smith Institute said: ‘Men and women often choose to make different career decisions, so they can embrace other, equally meaningful parts of their life. This, naturally, can be reflected in their pay.’

Read the full article here.

 

Kate Andrews's comments on the gender pay gap feature in City AM, Huffington Post and IBTimes

Head of Communications Kate Andrew’s comments on the Prime Minister’s pay gap pledge have featured in City AM, the Huffington Post UK and the International Business Times UK. From City AM:

“It’s a sad state of affairs when even the Prime Minister is promoting the gender pay gap myth. According to the Office for National Statistics, women between the ages of 22-39 working more than 30 hours a week earn, on average, more than their male counterparts,” said Kate Andrews from free-market think tank the Adam Smith Institute.

“Education, previous experiences, negotiating tactics, and unique abilities all contribute to one’s salary, none of which can be known by comparing John and Jane’s annual take-home pay on a spreadsheet.”

Read the full article here.

From the Huffington Post:

Commenting on Cameron's announcement, Kate Andrews of the Adam Smith Institute said it is a “sad state of affairs when even the Prime Minister is promoting the gender pay gap myth.” Andrews noted that according to the ONS, women between the ages of 22 – 39 working more than 30 hours a week "earn, on average, more than their male counterparts.”

"Forcing business with more than 250 employees to publish their ‘pay gaps’ will only promote more myths and confusion,” she said. “There is no such thing as an ‘average salary’; education, previous experiences, negotiating tactics, and unique abilities all contribute to one’s salary, none of which can be known by comparing John and Jane’s annual take-home pay on a spread sheet.”

"FTSE 100 companies have met the proposed target for 25% female board members not because the government told them to, but because women, through their own abilities and determination, are thriving in the work place more than ever before. But leave it to the government to try to usurp their achievements," she said.

Read the full article here.

From the International Business Times UK:

The Adam Smith Institute, a free market right-leaning thinktank also opposes the move, saying that it was a "sad state of affairs when even the prime minister is promoting the gender pay gap myth."

The institute's head of communications, Kate Andrews said that forcing businesses to publish their pay gaps will only promote more myths and confusion. "There is no such thing as an 'average salary''; education, previous experiences, negotiating tactics, and unique abilities all contribute to one's salary, none of which can be known by comparing John and Jane's annual take-home pay on a spreadsheet."

She said men and women also make different career decisions to allow them to embrace other parts of their life and this, naturally can be reflected in their pay, according to the Guardian.

Read the full article here.

Press Release: The gender pay gap is a myth

For further comments or to arrange an interview, contact Kate Andrews, Head of Communications, at kate@adamsmith.org | 07584 778207. Commenting on David Cameron's announcement to make businesses with 250+ employees publish their pay gap figures, Head of Communications at the Adam Smith Institute Kate Andrews said:

It’s a sad state of affairs when even the Prime Minister is promoting the gender pay gap myth. According to the ONS, women between the ages of 22 – 39 working more than 30 hours a week earn, on average, more than their male counterparts.

Forcing business with more than 250 employees to publish their ‘pay gaps’ will only promote more myths and confusion. There is no such thing as an ‘average salary’; education, previous experiences, negotiating tactics, and unique abilities all contribute to one’s salary, none of which can be known by comparing John and Jane’s annual take-home pay on a spreadsheet.

Furthermore, men and women often choose to make difference career decisions – usually based on flexibility and rigor – so they can embrace other, equally meaningful parts of their life; this, naturally, can be reflected in their pay.

The Prime Minster’s claim that the implementation of the National Living Wage will primarily help women in lower paid jobs is a weak justification for another recent policy faux pas. It is women, particularly who are less-skilled or less-educated, who are most likely to be part of the 60,000 who are estimated by the OBR to be cut by their employers when they are unable to afford this wage increase.

FTSE 100 companies have met the proposed target for 25% female board members not because the government told them to, but because women, through their own abilities and determination, are thriving in the work place more than ever before. But leave it to the government to try to usurp their achievements.

Notes to editors:

For further comments or to arrange an interview, contact Kate Andrews, Head of Communications, at kate@adamsmith.org | 07584 778207.

The Adam Smith Institute is a free market, libertarian think tank based in London. It advocates classically liberal public policies to create a richer, freer world.

Sam Bowman's comments on the Summer Budget in the Financial Times

Deputy Director Sam Bowman's comments on the Chancellor's latest Budget have featured in the Financial Times.

Sam Bowman of the Adam Smith Institute denounced the chancellor’s decision to impose a £7.20 minimum wage on business from April as a “disaster that will condemn tens of thousands of people to long-term unemployment”.

Mr Bowman wrote: “Almost all the most methodologically robust academic indicate that increases in the minimum wage kills jobs.”

Read the full article here.