We've got Meurig Raymond's new post-Brexit domestic agricultural policy right here

The NFU tells us that they're going to, post-Brexit, consult and formulate a new domestic agricultural policy for this newly sovereign nation of ours. What joy:

The NFU is launching an-industry wide consultation on the formulation of a domestic agricultural policy, following the decision of the UK to leave the EU.

NFU president Meurig Raymond described the forthcoming consultation, which the union hopes to have completed by September, as the ’biggest farming consultation in England and Wales for a generation’.

The announcement followed a ’spirited debate’ at today’s extraordinary NFU council meeting in London, attended by 90 farmers on the union’s ruling body drawn from across England and Wales and across the farming sectors.

We think we can guess the basics of that policy already. Give us lots and lots of money, possibly more than we already get, and we'll go back to only complaining about the weather.

Oh, look!

At this stage the council has agreed some basic principles on which to build a domestic policy, including demands for the ’best possible access’ to the EU market and ensuring support given to UK farmers is on a par with that received in the EU.

Gosh, that was a tough piece of divination, wasn't it?

We have an alternative policy framework to suggest. Let's just not have a policy. No subsidies, no payments, no department, no Minister, nothing, nowt, zippedy dooh dah. The New Zealand option. You've had it good for a century or more now there's yer bike and have a nice ride.

We would not swear that this is true but we have heard that it is so - British farming has long passed Parkinson's Event Horizon. There are now more bureaucrats "managing" farming than there are farmers farming. Let's not pay the farmers anything and thus we don't need the bureaucrats paying it - a double saving. Instead of £2 to £3 billion a year in taxes going to the farmers, plus whatever the amount again to pay it to them, we could just keep that what, £5 billion? And go and buy food from whomever.

Sounds like a plan really and we recommend it to all. Let's use Brexit to right some of the wrongs of our current system. One of those wrongs being the incessant whining and demands for bribery from the farming sector.

The correct design of the new domestic agriculture policy is that there isn't one. And nor is there any funding for either it or its absence. In short Meurig, go away.